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Advancing State Machines

Advancing and Performance Considerations

Advancing State Machines

In the render loop, as we’ve seen in previous sections, the essential goal of each frame is to:
  1. 1.
    Make the Renderer
  2. 2.
    Advance relevant StateMachine instances by an elapsed amount of seconds since the last frame paint
  3. 3.
    Draw relevant Artboard instances with the renderer
In many of our examples previously, we’ve called .advance(elapsedSeconds) on a single StateMachine instance, which moved the animations forward over time. With the Rive GameKit, there are multiple ways to advance state machines in a performant way, as well as draw the artboard.
  • StateMachine class
    • void advance(double elapsedSeconds)
      • Description: Advances the timeline animations on a singular StateMachine instance.
      • When to use: If you have just a few StateMachine instances in your scene, it should be fine to simply call this and separately render your Artboard
      • Example:
      bool paint(rive.RenderTexture texture, Size size, double elapsedSeconds) {
      // Advance a single state machine by elapsedSeconds
      stateMachine.advance(elapsedSeconds);
      }
  • Rive class
    • static void batchAdvance(Iterable<StateMachine> stateMachines, double elapsedSeconds)
      • Description: Advances the timeline animations on a list of StateMachine instances by splitting the work up among multiple threads in a worker thread pool
      • When to use: If you have a large amount of StateMachine instances in your scene that you want to advance all at the same time, this can be a more performant solution. If the state machine’s associated Artboard does not need to be drawn with the Renderer but still needs to be advanced, use this method. If you do need to render the associated Artboard, see the batchAdvanceAndRender method below.
      • Example:
      final Set<rive.Artboard> allZombieArtboards = {};
      final Set<rive.StateMachine> allZombieStateMachines = {};
      void populateZombies() {
      for (int i = 0; i < 1000; i++) {
      var artboard = riveFile.artboard("Zombie Man")!;
      allZombieArtboards.add(artboard);
      allZombieStateMachines.add(artboard.stateMachine("Motion")!);
      }
      }
      bool paint(rive.RenderTexture texture, Size size, double elapsedSeconds) {
      // Advance a list of state machines by elapsedSeconds
      rive.Rive.batchAdvance(allZombieStateMachines, elapsedSeconds);
      // Make a renderer.
      final renderer = rive.Renderer.make();
      // Only draw half the zombies
      for (int i = 500; i < 1000; i++) {
      var artboard = allZombieArtboards.elementAt(i);
      renderer.save();
      renderer.transform(
      rive.Mat2D.fromTranslate(size.width / 2, size.height / 2)
      );
      artboard.draw(renderer);
      renderer.restore();
      }
      }
    • static void batchAdvanceAndRender(Iterable<StateMachine> stateMachines, double elapsedSeconds, Renderer renderer)
      • Description: The same as batchAdvance() but also renders each of the state machine’s associated Artboard instances with the passed-in Renderer instance. The renderer also makes a transformation before drawing using the Artboard's renderTransform property, which is a Mat2D. You can set this property at any time.
      • When to use: Same as for using batchAdvance() but also for performantly drawing the Artboard with the Renderer.
      • Example:
      final Set<rive.StateMachine> allZombieStateMachines = {};
      // Set transformation to translate to a random location on the screen
      rive.Mat2D setRandomTranslation(rive.Artboard artboard) { . . . }
      void populateZombies() {
      for (int i = 0; i < 1000; i++) {
      var artboard = riveFile.artboard("Zombie Man")!;
      artboard.renderTransform = setRandomTranslation(artboard);
      allZombieStateMachines.add(artboard.stateMachine("Motion")!);
      }
      }
      bool paint(rive.RenderTexture texture, Size size, double elapsedSeconds) {
      // Make a renderer.
      final renderer = rive.Renderer.make();
      // Advance a list of state machines and render their artboards
      rive.Rive.batchAdvanceAndRender(
      allZombieStateMachines,
      elapsedSeconds,
      renderer
      );
      }

Other Performance Considerations

In addition to the few advance() functions above, there are other techniques that you should be considerate of at design time to keep your game performant.
  • Don't use the even-odd fill rule. If you need to cut a hole in a shape, make sure to wind the path the opposite direction
  • Don't enable the artboard clip option
  • Don't nest an artboard inside a clip
  • While clipping should be performant in your games when drawing, try to use it as a last resort if you can achieve similar effects another way
Last modified 10mo ago